If you think I'm funny, you should ... get out more.

 

Upon Entering Best Buy

Me: That sign says Best Buy has techfitters.

Wife: So?

Me: Techfitter is not a real word. Companies can't just make up words.

Wife: Who cares?

Me: "Welcome to Best Buy! Have a hurfuffle day!"

Wife: Stop.

newyorker:

Sarah Larson remembers helping a lost Elaine Stritch in Central Park: http://nyr.kr/1mYQxFa

“After a while, I felt like a creep for not acknowledging that I knew who she was, and I said, ‘By the way, I think you’re terrific.’
‘Thank you!’ she shouted. ‘You know, fans recognize me all over the place. But the second you need anything, they’re never around! They’re like the police!’”

Photograph: Todd Heisler/The New York Times/Redux

newyorker:

Sarah Larson remembers helping a lost Elaine Stritch in Central Park: http://nyr.kr/1mYQxFa

“After a while, I felt like a creep for not acknowledging that I knew who she was, and I said, ‘By the way, I think you’re terrific.’

Thank you!’ she shouted. ‘You know, fans recognize me all over the place. But the second you need anything, they’re never around! They’re like the police!’”

Photograph: Todd Heisler/The New York Times/Redux

Played 108 times

popappella:

Todd Rundgren - Hodja (Make Me Spin)

Album: A Cappella

Todd Rundgren wasn’t known for a cappella music but this track from his all vocal album, aptly titled “A Cappella” quickly became a doo wop classic in the 1980s….

If you think you’ve heard this song before, it was probably on Full House

Aw Yeeah! A crowd-pleaser for the late-80’s Kenyon College Chasers. 

Anonymous asked
Were you a child prodigy?

fishingboatproceeds:

No.

I was a reasonably good elementary school student (although certainly not the best in my class), and then a not-very-good middle school student, and then a poor student for much of high school. (I failed my junior English class, and had to write essays about The Bluest Eye and Twelfth Night over the summer to get a D.)

Some of this had to do with intellectual challenges: I was a bit behind the curve when it came to abstractions. Like, I could not handle the idea of the equation x + 2 = 4, because x is not a number, so how is that even possible? My struggle with abstractions was also seen in my study of literature and anything that couldn’t be, like, memorized. (I’ve always been a pretty good speller, for instance.)

Some of my troubles in school also had to do with what in retrospect were social and mental health challenges. But I was very lucky to have teachers who saw a lot of potential in me and refused to give up on me, even when I was defiant and annoying and set off fireworks outside their bedroom windows. (Do not do this. It is not cool. It is just annoying.)

That said, I think it’s an oversimplification to say that I was a “troubled child” or whatever. By college, I was engaged and interested in many of my subjects and became, as my favorite college professor once called me, “a solid B+ kind of fellow.”

I don’t think it’s fair to see some kids as merely smart and others as merely troubled, or to think that kids who are performing poorly in school are simply miscreants/stupid/whatever. (It’s also unfair to portray kids who perform well in school or who have expansive vocabularies or whatever as inherently untroubled.)

Learning is hard, and learning how to learn is hard, and it doesn’t happen overnight. It really is something that we have to do for a lifetime—or, more optimistically, that we get to do for a lifetime. 

How DARE you say “Happy 4th of July”! That’s like “Happy holidays”. It’s INDEPENDENCE DAY!

(via teapartycat)